1024 × 512


Are Nissan Murano good cars? 

 

Modern vehicles, with all of their innovations and features, leave consumers with more and more factors to consider when buying. To make things even more complicated, a mid-sized, crossover SUV is designed to be a versatile vehicle, fulfilling many roles. In such a competitive market, you can’t determine if a car is good or not without considering what else is available.

 

With that in mind, we’ll try to show whether or not the Murano is a good choice based on some of its most important aspects. And we’ll also see how it stacks up in comparison to its direct competitors.

Fuel efficiency

Here is a table comparing the fuel efficiency of the Murano and its closest rivals:

 

Vehicle

City

Highway

Combined

Murano

20

28

23

Highlander (Hybrid)

21 (35)

29 (36)

24 (35)

Edge (2.7L V6)

21 (19)

29 (26)

24 (22)

Equinox

22

28

24

Note: fuel efficiency is measured in miles per gallon. 

 

As you can see, the Murano is, unfortunately, one of the less efficient vehicles in its class. However, with a 3.5L V6 engine - it’s also one of the most powerful. When compared with the Ford Edge 2.7L V6, you actually get better fuel economy for a larger engine from the Murano. The Murano is also head to head with the Highlander which also features a 3.5L V6, although the latter outputs slightly more horsepower.

 

Of course, the clear winner here is one of the hybrid trims for the Highlander. However, this is also potentially the most expensive option.

 

All-in-all, the Nissan Murano is a solid option when weighing the balance between price, power, and fuel economy. Surprisingly, all of these vehicles have a combined mileage lower than the national average.

Driveability

When considering the question, “Are Nissan Murano good cars?” we want to weigh driveability, too. Traditionally, driveability has not been the Murano’s strongest suit. As one of the bulkier cars in its class, it’s a bit slow out of the starting blocks. The steering feedback is also slightly sluggish, and you can feel a bit of body roll when turning a corner.

 

However, it’s on the open road that the V6 engine really shines. Once you get going, you’ll find you have more than enough power to keep up with, and even pass, other vehicles. 

 

Nissan’s CVT transmission also provides relatively smooth gear changes. In general, the Murano is all about ride comfort but not necessarily about an engaging driving experience. The ideal way to drive the Murano is to get on the highway and switch on the cruise control. Then sit back and enjoy knowing that you have enough power in reserve for those times you need to overtake.

 

In short, it’s comparable to other larger mid-sized SUVs like the Highlander. The Equinox and Edge might have a bit more pep when pulling away, but you won’t have that same beefiness at higher speeds. These smaller vehicles also tend to provide a more engaging ride.

 

Overall, the Highlander probably offers the best driveability, although this does come at a higher cost.

Price - Is the Nissan Murano good value for money?

Let’s get down to the bottom line.

 

Now that you know what the Murano has to offer, it’s time to see what it’ll set you back. How much will it cost?

 

Here’s a breakdown of the Murano’s and its competitors’ pricing with the lowest, mid-range, and highest-priced trims according to their manufacturer’s suggested retail prices (MSRPs):

 

Vehicle

Lowest

Highest

Mid-range

Murano

$31,530 (S FWD)

$45,330 (Platinum AWD)

$36,760 (SV AWD)

Highlander

$34,600 (L FWD)

$41,200 (XLE AWD)

$38,400 (LE AWD)

Edge (2.7L V6)

$31,100 (SE)

$43,265 (ST AWD)

$34,355 (SEL FWD)

Equinox

$24,995 (L) 

$34,195 (Premier AWD)

$30,295 (LT AWD)

 

It’s worth noting that the average car price has risen to around $34,000. That puts these mid-sized crossovers just above the average.

 

As you can see, the Equinox is by far the most affordable option in this class. However, it’s also generally the least impressive. It has a smaller and less comfortable interior, one of the least powerful engines, and a more basic set of features. The Highlander has the highest MSRPs for entry-level and mid-range trims among the vehicles listed here. Surprisingly, though, it’s top-level trim is one of the most affordable.

 

The Murano is the second most expensive model overall after the Highlander. However, it does back this up with its features, particularly in the Platinum trim. This trim comes with just about every driver-assist and infotainment feature available. Overall, the Murano also has the second-most powerful engine and relatively good fuel economy.

 

The Murano’s biggest advantage is that even the base model comes with the most important driver-assist and infotainment features. Higher-tier models usually come with upgraded versions, as well as more luxurious features, like cruise control and a moonroof.

 

For example, forward collision warning is one feature not standard with most of the Murano’s competitors. And the same goes for the AroundView? mirror system and the rear door alert.

So, are Nissan Murano good cars?

At the very least, the Nissan Murano seems to be above average in just about every regard.

 

However, it stands out in a number of aspects, especially its powerful engine and wide range of technological features. These two elements more than explain its slightly lower fuel economy and higher price.

A Nissan for every need

The Nissan Murano gives you options. With four different trims (each with a choice between FWD and AWD) and a $14,000 price range, you’ll be able to shop around according to your budget and requirements. Are Nissan Murano good cars? In short - yes, the Nissan Murano is a good car - just about every way you look at it.

 

Shop Nissan Murano Inventory

 

Subscribe to Our Blog

Popular Tags